code revision process faqs

A work group of students, faculty and staff reviewed the codes over the course a of 8 month period. They solicited both internal and external stakeholder feedback throughout the process.
The workgroup was formed in August 2017. The group met at monthly intervals to review the existing code. In February, drafting of the new code began in direct partnership with the UF General Counsel’s Office. Ed Stoner, National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA) past president and author of the Model Code, was brought in as an external consultant.

The workgroup met with the UF academic integrity task force at multiple points throughout the process.

The code revisions were brought to the faculty senate and endorsed by both the incoming and outgoing Faculty Senate presidents.

The revised code was listed for public comment before being brought to the UF Board of Trustees for approval.

Yes. Five students sat on the code workgroup, including a graduate student, an SG representative, a U Matter We Care ambassador, the Student Honor Code Chancellor, and a Student Conduct Committee member. Additionally, students had the opportunity to give input during the public comment period.
Yes. The revised code focuses on education, and simplification of language. Frequently Asked Questions documents, educational materials, and training resources will be created to support readers in their understanding of the regulation. To further enhance clarity for students, clear presumption of innocence is expressly stated.

Also, in alignment with best practice, the regulation must be reviewed every three years.

  • Regulation now contains a standard for charging.
  • Inclusion of a definition of Incapacitation.
  • Interim Restrictions are more clearly defined and included in the Regulation (e.g.(No Contact Directives, Interim Restrictions, and Interim Suspensions).
  • A clear presumption of innocence is stated.
  • A minimum three-year review of the Regulation is now required.
  • Three parts of the process have been separated from each other to clearly delineate – Investigations, the Student Conduct Process, and Appeals.
  • Frequently Asked Questions documents, educational materials, and training resources will be created to support readers in their understanding of the Regulation.

Student Conduct Code and Honor Code (on and following 6/7/18)

Access to both the new Student Honor and Student Conduct Codes and the Regulations prior to 6/7/18 are available on the Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution website.
Student rights and responsibilities are afforded throughout the University conduct process. Students may be given the opportunity to waive specific rights, in writing, to expedite the resolution process if appropriate. Student rights can be found on page 20 of the Orange Book.
You will meet with a Student Conduct Administrator. A Student Conduct Administrator is a person or administrative unit whose duties include the administration of the Student Conduct Code or the Student Honor Code process. Student Conduct Administrators are designated by the Dean of Students and may include staff members in Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution and in Housing and Residence Life Education.
Once SCCR receives a report we will send an overlay to the Registrar and formal notice to the student. Cases are addressed as they come in, please allow a couple of business days for processing.
Accused Students can access and review the case file at least five (5) Business Days before the scheduled Hearing by scheduling an appointment with SCCR. Reporting Persons have the right to review their own written statement and their own submitted information at least five (5) business Days prior to the scheduled Hearing.
You will need to notify SCCR by contacting the Student Conduct Administrator coordinating your case and/or by contacting our office at sccr@dso.ufl.edu or phone at 352-392-1261.
Please refer to the Records section of the Student Conduct Code.
The decision letter sent to you will indicate how and to whom you may turn in your sanctions.
Alcohol abuse can be defined as facilitating, arranging, or participating in any extreme alcohol consumption activity that constitutes, facilitates, or encourages competitive, rapid, or excessive consumption of alcohol when such activity occurs on campus, in the housing of any University of Florida organization or group, or in connection with a University Activity.
A Student issued a Notice of Charges for an alleged Student Honor Code violation will not be permitted to drop or withdraw from the course and will have a temporary grade of “N” for “no grade” will be issued until the final resolution of the case.
During your information meeting you will have the opportunity to choose “Responsible” or “Not Responsible” to the Charges, which determines the next course of action in the Student Conduct Process.
Faculty should gather relevant information to support the honor code allegation, decide on proposed sanctions, and submit an online report to Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution (SCCR). SCCR will change the grade to “N” which prevents course withdrawal, and place holds as necessary. SCCR will send formal notice to students, meet with students to initially review allegations, rights, and faculty proposed sanctions. If the student elects a hearing option, faculty would provide information in required hearings with students.
Student conduct records will be maintained in the Dean of Students Office through the Student’s graduation from the University. In cases where the Student does not graduate, the record will be maintained as long as the Student remains eligible to re-enroll.
“Not in good standing” means that a student has failed to demonstrate an ability to comply with University rules, regulations, and stipulated requirements because the student has accepted or been found responsible for either a significant violation or multiple violations of the Student Honor Code or Student Conduct Code. This definition applies only in the context of the Student Honor Code or Student Conduct Code and does not relate to or impact any other definitions of “good standing” used at the University, including those pertaining to academic good standing. The status of being not in good standing does not automatically subject the student to any restrictions.
If you have received this restriction, it means you cannot attend or participate in any activity or function on behalf of either the University or a student organization registered with the University. This includes conventions, conferences, meetings, and intramural and club sporting events managed through the Department of Recreational Sports, and it applies whether you were planning to attend or participate in person or virtually.

This restriction does not impact your ability to represent the University on an intercollegiate athletic team, to hold an office in a registered student organization, or to participate in a study abroad program. Those restrictions are separately listed in the Code and must be specifically listed in your outcome letter to apply to you.

“Not in good standing” means that a student has failed to demonstrate an ability to comply with University rules, regulations, and stipulated requirements because the student has accepted or been found responsible for either a significant violation or multiple violations of the Student Honor Code or Student Conduct Code. This definition applies only in the context of the Student Honor Code or Student Conduct Code and does not relate to or impact any other definitions of “good standing” used at the University, including those pertaining to academic good standing. The status of being not in good standing does not automatically subject the student to a loss of privileges.
The Code defines “Loss of University privileges” in Section 7.B.4 (Regulation 4.040). In that Section, you can find examples of what kinds of limitations you may experience if you lose University privileges. If you receive this sanction or it is listed as part of another sanction, your outcome letter will specifically list what privileges you have lost. If your outcome letter does not list any specific lost privileges, you have not lost any, and “Loss of University privileges” does not apply to you.
If you have lost this University privilege, it means you cannot attend or participate in any activity or function on behalf of either the University or a student organization registered with the University.  This includes conventions, conferences, and meetings, and it applies whether you were planning to attend or participate in person or virtually.

This loss of privilege does not impact your ability to represent the University as a Student athlete, as that determination will be made by the University Athletic Association.  It also does not impact your ability to attend athletic functions; to hold leadership positions within Student Organizations as defined by Student Activities and Involvement or individual Student Organization by-laws/constitutions; to study abroad; to have unrestricted University facility use, parking privileges, or University computer usage; to participate in social/philanthropy activities, intramurals or block seating; to reserve space for meetings/events on-campus; or to receive future Institutional funding.  Those losses of privilege are separately listed in the Code and must be specifically listed in your outcome letter to apply to you.

Dean Certifications can be submitted online here.
Students can request in writing that their conduct record be expunged. Click here to see if your violation may be considered for expungement.

In order for your request to be considered you must submit a request here, and the following additional documentation:

  1. A copy of your Application for Graduation OR a signed letter from your academic advisor illustrating that you have applied to graduate.
  2. A typed signed statement explaining your request for a conduct record expungement

 

Waiting until a student has applied to graduation ensures that the student is in fact graduating, and that we no longer have to retain a record for that student.
To inquire about a hold on your account please email sccr@dso.ufl.edu or your hearing officer. To see why the Dean of Students Office may place a service indicator on your record please see page 39 of the Orange Book.
In order to attend the AODL Seminar you are required to complete the Pre-Class Activities. Following attending the seminar, and in order to be marked as complete for your sanction you will also need to complete the Post-Class Activities. Without completing both online activities, you will not be marked as complete for the sanction.
This gives the institution notice of who will be in a hearing, in addition to giving SCCR adequate time to assure proper space for a meeting/hearing.
Students must provide the identity of the person(s) and the appropriate signed privacy waiver(s) to the Director of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution or designee at least two (2) Business Days in advance.
Amanda Campbell who can be reached at acampbell@ufsa.ufl.edu
For most minor incidents, SCCR will clear a student’s application and return it to admissions for regular admissions review. This process takes approximately one week. The more information you provide on your application related to the conduct, the less likely it is your application will be delayed in order to get more information.

If you don’t provide enough information on your application about your previous conduct you will likely be sent a letter asking for more information regarding your previous conduct. Once additional documents and information are received it typically takes approximately one week to process in SCCR before it is sent back to admissions for a review in the regular admissions process if it is cleared.

If an applicant is refused admission on the basis of past misconduct, they may appeal in writing to the Vice President for Student Affairs within ten (10) days of the date of the written notification of denial or admission.
If an appeal is granted, the appeal authority may modify the Sanctions imposed or may remand the case for a re-opened or new hearing.

If modified, sanctions can decrease or increase in severity or quantity.

faculty & staff faqs

If you are unsure whether a violation has occurred, please document the incident, including the names and UFIDs of the student’s involved, along with any other information that could be relevant to both the identification of the individuals involved and the case itself, and submit an Incident Report. If we believe that a violation may have occurred, you will be notified at a later time to provide further information regarding the incident.
If you believe that more than one student is involved in an incident, please report all names of those involved including those who you believe may have witnessed the incident. You will be notified at a later time to give more information once we have determined what students (if any) may have committed a violation.
As a faculty of the University of Florida, it is important that you report possible Conduct and Honor code violations to the SCCR, as students must be held accountable for violating the University of Florida’s expectations. Without faculty reporting violations, the value of a degree from the University of Florida and the integrity of the all past and present University faculty, staff, and students are diminished.

Furthermore, we as a University are legally liable for the actions of our students and need to cultivate an environment of fairness and equality. By having potentially committed a violation of the Student Honor or Conduct Code, the student is undermining that fairness and it is the faculty’s responsibility to notify us of the potential violation, so that we can ensure the protection of everyone affiliated with the University of Florida.

Incident reports can be submitted online by visiting here.
Any information that you believe could be relevant to the case should be included in your initial report. If we believe a violation may have occurred, you will be notified and will be able to express more information regarding the incident at a later time.
The instructor of record for the course is responsible for all grade submissions to the Office of the University Registrar. While an allegation is being resolved, a grade of “N* (No Grade)” should be submitted until after the incident is fully resolved.

If an incident is resolved after grade submission timelines, grade changes should be submitted by the faculty member using the Grade Change Paperwork; which should be requested from your College/Department’s University Registrar Approved Contact. If you are unsure who your College/Department Approved Contact is, please contact the Office of the University Registrar at 352-392-1374.

Once SCCR sends out a charge letter to the student regarding the allegation, faculty are welcome to have a conversation with the student if you so choose.
Faculty are no longer required to meet with the student. Once SCCR sends out a charge letter to the student regarding the allegation, faculty are welcome to have a conversation with the student if you so choose.
Faculty no longer need to have their student complete/sign a written form. This will be facilitated through SCCR.
The new regulation requires that reports must be made to SCCR before submission of a final grade for the course.  In extenuating circumstances, the Dean of Students or designee has discretion to extend this time period. For example: the matter is not brought to the attention of the Faculty member until after grades are submitted.

This time limit more explicitly complies with the Board of Governors Regulation 6.0105 (1(i)).

Faculty will no longer be required to contact our office for information on prior history, as SCCR will meet with the student whether the allegation would be their first violation or an additional one.
If a conduct violation may have occurred, then a hearing will be scheduled with either an administrator or with the Student Conduct Committee. If an honor code violation may have occurred, and the student does not accept responsibility, disagrees with the sanctions, or has already committed a prior honor code violation, then a hearing will be scheduled in front of the Student Conduct Committee.
At the University of Florida, students have the right to question their accuser(s) so it is vital that the accusing party is part of the hearing. Also, as the accuser, it is the faculty member’s job to represent the University of Florida by explaining how they believe a violation of the Student Honor or Conduct Code may have occurred.
It is very difficult to estimate how long a formal hearing will last, as every case is unique. As a faculty member, you will only need to be available for the hearing itself and will not have to be present during the deliberations and the recommendations. If you have concerns or questions regarding the length of the hearing, please contact our office prior to the hearing date.
It is very difficult to estimate how many hours collecting evidence, talking with the student, and giving information both informally and formally to our office will take. However, the more information a faculty can provide during the initial stages of our process, the faster we can have a hearing and resolve a situation. It is often the case that faculty are frustrated by how time consuming our process is because they fail to both address the situation in a timely manner, and provide us with the evidence we need to charge a student.
Yes. After the hearing, the accusing faculty members will be notified by a member of the SCCR office regarding the outcome of the hearing.
Depending on the severity of the situation, students may be affected by possible status sanctions such as conduct probation, suspension, and expulsion from the University. For conduct code violations, students may also have to pay for any damages they have caused, perform community service or spend time on other educational sanctions. For honor code violations, students may receive educational sanctions as well as assignment or grade reductions, including but not limited to, a failing grade in the course.
As a professor or teaching assistant at the University of Florida, you may recommend any sanctions that you deem appropriate for the incident at hand.  Under guidelines by the University of Florida, an “E” or reduced grade on the assignment in question and/or course and an educational sanction are examples of proper sanctions.

If a student does not agree with the proposed sanctions then these sanctions will still be taken into consideration by the hearing body during a formal conduct hearing.